Second Annual LGBTQ Inclusivity in Higher Education Conference:
Facing the Dragon

5th and 6th September 2017
Hosted and Presented by Swansea University, Bay Campus.

In this national conference on inclusivity in Higher Education, we will explore how to bring intersectionality into inclusive curricula across the Higher Education landscape, bringing equality home to the seats of learning and research.

Papers and workshops will be offered on many different aspects of inclusivity in HE, looking at the implementation of inclusive curricula, student and staff groups and networks, work on gender, trans* and transition, work on feminism, ethnicity, religion, age, occupation or identity, at the intersection of equality for staff and students.

Keynote Addresses will be given by Professor Cara Aitchison, President and Vice-Chancellor, Cardiff Metropolitan University: “From ‘marking difference’ to ‘making a difference’: the social-cultural nexus of power and personal responsibility in the leadership of higher education”, and Professor Martin Stringer, Pro-Vice Chancellor, Swansea University: “Herding dragons, intersectionality and the teaching of religion”. And a Plenary session will be led by Sian James, Welsh Labour Party politician and former MP for Swansea East, Sian James’ early political life story features in the film Pride.

The conference delegate fees are as follows.

Combined ticket (includes both days of the conference) – £95.
Day 1 only ticket – £50.
Day 2 only ticket – £50.

Combined concession ticket for students – £65.
Student day 1 only ticket – £35.
Student day 2 only ticket – £35.

Conference dinner – £35 (no concessions)

Book your place here!

A draft programme can be read here: LGBTQ Conference Programme draft

Detailed conference information including travel, accommodation, and accessibility, can be found here: Conference information for delegates

If you feel the costs would prevent you joining us, we have a limited Conference Fund available for free conference places (please note, carers will be provided a free space at the conference). To apply to the fund email lgbtplus@swansea.ac.uk with the subject ‘conference fund’ and a decision will be made on a case by case basis.

 

August 7th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

 

We have extended the deadline for submission of Abstracts to the 31 July 2017

See below for details

Swansea University, in Collaboration with the University of South Wales and Cardiff University would like to announce a Call for Papers and Save the Date for the:

Second Annual LGBTQ Inclusivity in Higher Education Conference:
Facing the Dragon

5th and 6th September 2017
Hosted and Presented by Swansea University, Wales, UK.

 

In this national conference on inclusivity in Higher Education, we will explore how to bring intersectionality into inclusive curricula across the Higher Education landscape, bringing equality home to the seats of learning and research.

We invite papers and posters on every aspect of inclusivity in HE, looking at the implementation of inclusive curricula, student and staff groups and networks, work on gender, trans* and transition, work on feminism, ethnicity, religion, age, occupation or identity, at the intersection of equality for staff and students. Maybe you have initiated a project to include more diverse authors on a curriculum, or signposted students to understanding the diverse backgrounds of leading figures in your field. Maybe you have published work that relates to inclusivity, or draw on diverse sources to develop your research and teaching practice. Maybe you work in an organisation that supports LGBTQ people and have insights from your own work to offer those within HE. We are looking for critical papers, discussion pieces, research, case studies and interactive workshops to develop inclusivity activities.

We invite scholars, activists, members of the community, students and others to submit abstracts of no more than 250 words, accompanied by a 50 word bio on any aspect of promoting inclusive curricula in HE, for either papers (15 minutes), interactive workshops (1 hour) or posters.

Deadline for Abstract Submission: 31 July 2017

Please send to: lgbtplus@swansea.ac.uk with ‘Abstract Submission’ in the subject

LGBTQ Chynwysoldeb yn Uwch Addysg GynhadleddAil Blynyddol LGBTQ Chynwysoldeb yn Uwch Addysg Gynhadledd :
Wynebu y Ddraig

5ed a 6ed medi 2017
Gynnal a Gyflwynwyd gan Brifysgol Abertawe, Cymru, y DU.

 

Yn y gynhadledd genedlaethol ar gynhwysiant mewn Addysg Uwch, rydym yn edrych ar sut i ddod rhyng-gysylltiadau i mewn cwricwla cynhwysol ar draws mae’r dirwedd Addysg Uwch, gan ddod â cydraddoldeb gartref i’r seddi dysgu ac ymchwil.

Rydym yn gwahodd papurau a phosteri ar bob agwedd o gynhwysiant yn ei FOD, yn edrych ar y gweithredu cwricwla cynhwysol, myfyrwyr a grwpiau staff a rhwydweithiau, yn gweithio ar rhyw, traws* a newid, yn gweithio ar ffeministiaeth, ethnigrwydd, crefydd, oed, galwedigaeth neu hunaniaeth, yn y groesffordd o gydraddoldeb ar gyfer staff a myfyrwyr. Efallai eich bod wedi cychwyn prosiect i gynnwys mwy amrywiol awduron ar y cwricwlwm neu arwydd myfyrwyr i ddeall y
gefndiroedd amrywiol o ffigurau blaenllaw yn eich pwnc. neu yn tynnu ar amrywiol ffynonellau I ddatblygu eich ymchwil ac ymarfer dysgu. Efallai eich bod yn gweithio mewn sefydliad sy’n cefnogi y boblo LHDTH+ ac wedi ennill dealltwriaeth o’r gwaith eich hun i gynnig y rhai o fewn Uwch Addysg. Rydym yn chwilio am hanfodol papurau, trafodaeth ddarnau, ymchwil, profiadau personol, astudiaethau achos a gweithdai rhyngweithiol i ddatblygu gweithgareddau cynhwysiant.

Rydym yn gwahodd ysgolheigion, gweithredwyr, aelodau o’r gymuned, myfyrwyr ac eraill i gyflwyno crynodeb o ddim mwy na 250 gair yng nghwmni 50 gair bywgraffiad ar unrhyw agwedd o hyrwyddo cynhwysol cwricwla mewn addysg uwch, naill ai ar gyfer papurau (15 munud), gweithdai rhyngweithiol gweithdai (1 awr) neu bosteri.

Dyddiad cau ar gyfer Cyflwyno Crynodeb: 311 gorffennaf 2017

Os gwelwch yn dda anfon i: lgbtplus@swansea.ac.uk gyda ‘Abstract Submission’ yn y pennawd

June 26th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

It is our great pleasure to give you a sneak preview of the delights on offer during our two-day conference on LGBT+ Inclusivity in HE this September.
Together with our colleagues from Cardiff University and the University of South Wales, we are working to bring you an innovative chance to engage with the future of education in Wales, in the UK, and across the world.

We have confirmed the following speakers:

Professor Cara Aitchison,President & Vice-Chancellor & Professor of Geography & Cultural Economy, Cardiff Metropolitan University, will offer the Keynote Address.

Sian James, former MP, will offer a plenary discussing her role in past and present politics, and referring to excerpts from the film Pride, fully locating our conference in the heartland of Welsh political activism

Professor Martin Stringer, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Swansea University, will offer a plenary and will also chair our closing debate on Intersectionality: Reconciling Faith, Belief and Religion with LGBT+ Equality.

The amazing and talented Bronwen Lewis, musician, (featured in the film Pride) will provide the entertainment for our conference dinner.

There will be a range of speakers, including those providing practical insight into improving inclusivity across the HE landscape, and bringing their experience and research to you.

Workshops will also address key issues of promoting inclusion and improving the student experience.

So come and join us at the beach for two days of networking, learning, sharing and fun, demonstrating our commitment to an inclusive future.

with very best wishes

Alys Einion and Cath Elms, co-chairs of Swansea LGBT+ Staff Network

Access the call for papers here:

email us: lgbtplus@Swansea.ac.uk

 

June 19th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Call for Papers:

Here are Swansea, we are delighted to be working in partnership with colleagues from Cardiff University and the University of South Wales, to present an exciting conference in LGBT+ Inclusivity and Equality.
The conference will be held on the 5 and 6 September, 2017, and booking details will be sent out soon.
The Call for Papers is accessible via the link above, and I would like to encourage everyone to consider contributing. This can be a research piece, an experience of being a student or member of staff in HE, an activity, a workshop, or even a poem, slide show, short film or anything else. We are looking for academics, teachers, students, members of the community, researchers, artists – and we want to make this an inclusive conference which challenges us all to make Higher Education the most supportive environment we can for all students and all staff.

For any questions, please contact the Swansea University LGBT+ Staff Network on lgbtplus@swansea.ac.uk

We very much look forward to welcoming you to our beautiful Bay Campus and sharing knowledge, expertise and ideas as we drive forward the equality agenda.

with very best wishes

Alys Einion and Cath Elms, Co-Chairs of the Swansea University LGBT+ Staff Network

June 1st, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

One Comment

Here are two experiences of pieces that have influenced me at various stages in my life. Having re read and re watched both I think how we are influenced very much depends where we are in our lives. But the truly great works let us take different things from them at different times.

 

The well of loneliness:

The well of loneliness by Radclyffe Hall is a 1928 lesbian novel which was banned on publication and not released in Britain until 1949 after Hall’s death. It was given to me ten years ago when I was an acting student in London. During the first year of my degree I met a wonderful woman who has since become a very good friend; she introduced me to it. I was in a very open, creative place and I devoured the book. I could relate to certain parts of the story but mainly I was excited that these stories existed, they certainly didn’t sell books like this in WHSmiths in Llanelli!

Several years later I became part of a book club with a different group of friends and we each took turn to recommend an influential book. This was my choice. I proudly shared the book and eagerly awaited everyone’s response. Naively at the time I expected everyone to be as instantly won over and inspired as I was. However the reality was they all hated it. They tore it apart labelling it depressing and too long. I was distraught. I opened a bottle of wine and spent a long evening passionately debating with them. I re read it again a few years later with many more years of life experience behind me and I could see their points more objectively. It is a long book, it is descriptive and it certainly isn’t a happy story but in my opinion it is a piece of beautiful and brave literature. It’s an honest story and it inspired me at an important time in my life.

 

Angels in America:

Angels in America is a play by Tony Kushner which was made in to a film starring Meryl Streep, Al Pacino and Emma Thompson (among many other fantastic actors) in 2003. It’s set in 1985 and centres around several characters connected by the Aids epidemic. Both the play and film are split into two chapters and in total, it takes seven hours to watch. I have sat through the film many times and several years ago watched the play in London. It requires an open mind, stamina and lots of snacks. The National Theatre are currently working on a production that in a few months will be screened to hundreds of cinemas across the country.

In keeping with my wanting to share plays, books, films that have influenced me I bought the film for my wife a few years ago but made the mistake of telling her it’s seven hours long. We haven’t got round to it yet. I’m trying to find a fine balance between highly recommending she watch it and not putting too much pressure on it so that it becomes a chore! I have however bought us tickets for the National Theatre screening in July so she has a short window before I force her into a seven hour evening! Again, if you have the time I would recommend it. It truly is a fantastic piece of work.

 

Lyndsey Fouracre-Reynolds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 27th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Catherine Fletcher reflects on reading Gary Ferguson’s new book Same-Sex Marriage in Renaissance Rome: Sexuality, Identity and Community in Early Modern Europe (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2016).

 

 

Although it isn’t the main focus of my research, over the years I’ve taught a number of classes on sexuality in early modern Europe. One of the most challenging issues for students is getting to grips with the idea that sexual identities five hundred years ago didn’t necessarily follow the patterns or labels we know today, and that the idea of a ‘homosexual’ type of person arose only in the nineteenth century.

 

The prevalence of ‘gay gene’ arguments in the past twenty years, and the dominance of the idea that LGBT people are ‘born not made’ – which indeed reflects the experience of many, but not all, people who define as LGBT – are a challenge when it comes to engaging with the rather different attitudes towards sexual identity that prevailed in the European past.

 

It is fairly well-established that quite a lot of men in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy had sex with other men without having a ‘homosexual’ identity. It was a stage in a lifecycle where men typically married in their late 30s or 40s (to much younger women) and where young women’s sexuality was subject to close control. Ferguson’s contribution, in his new book on Same Sex Marriage in Renaissance Rome, is to suggest that for some men, however, ‘a permanent homosexual desire was a defining characteristic, not only of their sexual life but also of their life more generally’.

 

He makes this case with a small-scale study of a tragic event that took place in Rome in 1578. It involved a group of mainly Spanish men who had gathered at the church of San Giovanni in Porta Latina, as they often did, to have sex with other men. On 20 July that year they had planned a wedding and accompanying feast for two of their number. The wedding did not go ahead (one of the grooms was ill). Worse was to come: the authorities got wind of the plans, and eleven of the men were arrested. They were interrogated and tortured, and eight of them were burnt at the stake.

 

We know about this story because, in 1581, the French essayist Michel Montaigne heard it, and recorded it in his travel journal. Ferguson adds to this account details from the men’s trial (which survives in part; it was apparently burnt with them), from their wills and from other correspondence written by people in Rome at the time. The details of what happened on the day itself remain sketchy, but the men’s testimony raises fascinating questions about how sexual identity was understood in this period. This is not only the case as regards the extent to which sexual identity might be central to an individual’s sense of self, but also in terms of sexual practice. Most scholarship to date has argued that sexual roles in same-sex relationships in this period were typically fixed with one active and one passive partner, but at least some of this Roman community were versatile and switched roles within their partnerships.

 

This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in the history of same-sex relationships.

 

 

Catherine Fletcher is Associate Professor in History and Heritage at Swansea University. Her full review of Gary Ferguson’s book will be up at H-Net Reviews shortly.

 

February 27th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Review of the Pride and Prejudice LGBT+ Symposium

Last week the Network held our first LGBT+ symposium titled ‘Pride and Prejudice’, which was a celebration of LGBT+ people in history, literature, the media and politics.  The event included a diverse range of keynote speakers from the LGBT+ community, as well as researchers and academics, each providing an insight into the varied and valuable history of LGBT+ people.

Director of Student Services Kevin Child opened the day with a passionate address on the importance of celebrating LGBT+ history, and highlighting the great work that is currently going on in the Swansea area.

The talks of the day were structured into four themed sessions: ‘We’re Here, We’re Queer’, ‘Talking Trans*’, ‘Ups and Downs’, and ‘Making History Today’. Each session contained an engaging mix of academic papers and talks from LGBT+ people sharing their own personal stories.

The Staff Network co-chairs were proud to participate alongside such great speakers; Alys provided the keynote speech setting the scene at the start of the day, exploring issues of LGBT+ identity and shared history, and Cath provided an engaging talk on fanzines and self-publishing as a means of doing queer activism. The Network interim vice-chair Eve Moriarty also contributed a fascinating paper that explored drag and gender fluidity.

In the afternoon, journalism students from the university came to film the event as part of their documentary on LGBT activism in Swansea, and the Network co-chairs were interviewed on topics including inclusivity at the university.

Towards the end of the day, a panel discussion was held on the importance of recognising and celebrating LGBT+ history, featuring a range of experiences from across the LGBT spectrum. The panel discussion was followed by an open floor Q&A session, which featured great audience participation and an exploration of some challenging issues.

The event was closed by Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Hilary Lappin-Scott, who gave an enthusiastic speech on the importance of LGBT activism and expressing pride at the achievements of Swansea University over the last two years in this area. Hilary also shared the exciting news that today the rainbow flag was successfully raised on the flagpole over Swansea University for the first time, demonstrating a clear and visible commitment to LGBT issues. The flag will stay up for the duration of LGBT History Month.

The symposium provided attendees with some unique and interesting personal stories, new perspectives on the issues, and some actionable ideas on how to progress LGBT+ equality in the future.

 

By Cath Elms

Co-Chair, LGBT+ Staff Network

 

Cath’s previous posts:

Straight Until Proven Queer

On Being an Imperfect Role Model

Ada Lovelace’s Poetical Science

 

February 27th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule/Desert Hearts dir. Donna Deitch.

Desert of the Heart is a classic novel by Jane Rule which explores the lives of women in America in the 1960ss. Set against the backdrop of the Nevada Desert and exploring life in the 1950s when women’s lives were very much restricted, it explores the relationship between an English Professor and a young woman living on a ranch in Reno, and provides an explicit account of emergent lesbian love and its challenges. Rule evokes a vivid and detailed world in which the attraction between two women, as problematic as it is, signifies life, energy, and vitality.

The 1985 film inspired by the book, Desert Hearts, directed by Donna Deitch, is as transgressive and thought provoking as the book, but for different reasons. It is the first lesbian film of its type which presents both the angst of lesbian life and love and a potential happy ending, unlike its predecessors such as The Killing of Sister George and The Children’s Hour. It was also the very first lesbian film I ever saw.

I was 19 years old, at my first ever ‘grown-up’ lesbian party, in a house actually owned by a lesbian couple. Everything was new. I knew nothing of how gay people could live together, and had come to my awareness of my sexuality in my own ‘desert of the heart’ with no idea of what it meant to be attracted to my own sex. I remember the room was full of women, of various ages, styles and sizes, and I was on a date with a woman I had been attracted to for months. I settled down in front of the sofa, on the floor, to watch the film, which everyone else had seen many times, and it was only during the hotel room scene that I realised they were all watching me, and my reactions, rather than the film!

The film and book are radically different in many ways, and in particular, the relationship between Cay/Ann and the stepmother Frances differs strongly. However, the narratives resonate powerfully for me and for many people I have talked to because of the issue of the close relationship between a mother and her daughter/stepdaughter and the issues with that daughter developing a close bond with another woman. This raises some interesting questions about the nature of women’s intimate and close relationships and for this reason the book is very much on my recommended reading list for friends and the film remains one of my favourites. The book in particular speaks strongly to me of the tension between family and romantic love, and in particular, the loss that many LGBT+ people have faced, having to choose between their family and their identity, when family cannot accept their gender or sexuality. To lose the support and love of your birth family is tragic, but for many it is simply a fact of their life.

In the wider context of LGBT+ history, both the book and the film are products of their time, but still relevant now. Many women did not (and still do not) identify an attraction to women until later in their lives, often after marrying and having children. This may indeed be the same for people of all genders, and it makes me reflect on the ways in which we are ‘channelled’ towards certain expectations and choices in life. Our collective history certainly shows that regardless of the social, political and legal conditions in which our lives take place, we still fight for the freedom to live and love honestly and without oppression. This is more apparent than ever in today’s changing global and political landscape. The value of works such as these lies in their ability to ground us both in the past and in the reaffirmation of our commitment to a better future, for all.

February 8th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Tags: , ,

One Comment

As part of LGBT History month the library here at Swansea University have put together a reading list of books, DVDS and journals on LGBT related themes.
Most of these are available at Singleton Park library but students can always request that items are brought to the Bay Library or Miners’ Library. They have also written a blog post to advertise the list at:

http://issnews.swan.ac.uk/?p=3105 (English version)

http://issnews.swan.ac.uk/?p=3112 (Welsh version)

The reading list is here:

http://ifindreading.swan.ac.uk/widget/?course=LGBT

We here at the network are delighted to see the Library respond in this way to LGBT History Month.

And if that isn’t enough, there will be more discussions of LGBT+ fiction and films on this blog throughout the month.

February 7th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

It has been an amazing weekend basking in the glory of our Award win, but here is the current line-up for our Symposium on 15 February (updated on 7 February).  It is going to be a great day, with lunch provided. You can still get tickets at

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pride-and-prejudice-an-lgbt-history-month-symposium-tickets-29639855606

9.00 Registration
9.30 Welcome and Introduction to the Day: Kevin Child, Director of Student Services, Swansea University
9.40 Keynote Address: Dr Alys Einion, Associate Professor, Author and Co-Chair LGBT+ Staff Network. Pride and Prejudice: The Past, the Present, the Future?
Session 1: We’re Here, We’re Queer Chair: Dr Alys Einion
10.15 Cath Camps and Catherine Emmett New Wave Queerness and the Academy
10.35 Cath Elms:
10.55 Dr Catherine Fletcher: Same-Sex Marriage in Renaissance Rome
11.15 BREAK
Session 2: Talking Trans* Chair: Cath Elms
11.30 Jenny-Anne Bishop: 12 Years of Sparkling in Swansea and Manchester
11.50 Glenn Miles: Vulnerability and Resilience of Transgender women in Cambodia and Thailand
12.10 Eve Elizabeth Moriarty: Born Naked: Drag, Gender Fluidity, Feminism and Me.
12.30 Dr Michele Raithby: Investigating Dignified and Inclusive Health and Social Care for Older Trans* People in Wales: The TrAC Project
12.50 LUNCH
Session 3 Ups and Downs Chair: Eve Moriarty
13.30 Andrew Davies (Unity Centre): We All Fall Down
13.50 Mark Lilly Auntie Hate: BBC Homophobia and its Evolution
14.10 Kirsti Bohata: Amy Dillwyn
14.30 Edith England and Josie Henley: The internet as a tool to reduce LGBT health inequalities: a partnership approach
14.50 BREAK
Session 4 Making History Today Chair: Dr Alys Einion
15.10 Mitchell Jones (Calon): Role Models and Staff LGBT Networks
15.30 Neil Harris: Surveying the landscape: dystopos, eutopos and the LGBT+ language learning experience
15.50 Panel Discussion: Making History Today Dr Alys Einion (Chair), Cath Elms, Neil Harris, Jenny-Anne Bishop, Mark Lilly, Dr Michele Raithby.
16.20 Closing Address: Professor Hilary Lappin-Scott, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Swansea University
16.30 Close and Invitation to the Social (at Taliesin Arts Centre): Cath Elms and Alys Einion
 

19.30

 

Optional Film Screening at Taliesin Arts Centre (must be booked in advance) Visit

http://www.taliesinartscentre.co.uk/cinema.php?id=1458

February 6th, 2017

Posted In: Uncategorized

Tags: ,

Leave a Comment

Next Page »
css.php

© Swansea University

Hosted by Information Services and Systems, Swansea University